Studia Translatorica

ISSN: 2084-3321 • e-ISSN: 2657-4802 • DOI: 10.23817/strans

Mission and scope

The journal Studia Translatorica was established in 2010. The first issue contained articles documenting the discussions which took place during the international conference Translation: Theorie – Praxis – Didaktik in September 2009 in the Institute of German Studies at the University of Wrocław. The leading theme of the conference set the direction for the journal, which currently forms the ground for academic reflections on the matter of theoretical and practical aspects of translation as well as its professional didactics.

Within the centre of the academic reflections, undertaken in the published articles lie the issues of different forms of translating and interpreting, sight translations, audiovisual translations considered i.a. in the context of translatorical, linguistic, psycholinguistic and cognitive models. We also publish in our journal the results of research conducted within the framework of experimental translatorics, which give an insight into the rules of interpersonal verbal communication taking place in different types of translation settings. Authors who scrutinize translation against the background of its communicative and intercultural conditions are also welcome. Likewise, within our field of interest lie articles in academic translation didactics and translation teaching. The aim of the journal Studia Translatatorica is to enable an exchange of international academic thought. Hence the possibility to publish not only papers written in Polish, but also in German, English, Italian, etc.

A significant part of our journal is the section presenting reviews on the latest publications in the translation theory, practice and didactics. In this section reports from events, conferences and congresses dedicated to broadly defined translation aspects are also included.

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